Workshops

Anti-Racist Sex Ed: How Social Workers Can Advocate for Change
Katie Childs
Sexual health education has often been wielded as a tool of white supremacy, but intersectional frameworks and anti-racism principles offer an affirming alternative. This workshop will offer examples of anti-racist sex ed lessons and techniques to use with students and learners across the life span and will empower social workers to be advocates for sexual health. Participants will leave with toolkit of advocacy skills to use when implementing anti-racist sexed as an educator, when championing anti-racist sex ed in our educational systems, or when serving as an informal anti-racist sex educator to peers.
Appropriate as an introductory workshop on the topic.

Workshop Summary    Workshop Slides

Social Work Must Be Anti-Racist Work
Jacob Hanifl
I will be discussing with workshop attendees how our Code of Ethics requires us to anti-racist work. Using the definition, borrowed by Ibram X. Kendi, of “racist” and “anti-racist”, we will isolate race and check our beliefs. We will be asking ourselves why racist ideas, policies, and practices exist in our agencies, if we are living up to our Code of Ethics. I will be sharing with attendees about techniques and skills used to advocate for just policies and practices and share how we are protected in doing this work. Activities during the workshop will include: Turn & Talks; Share Outs; Word Clouds – via text from participants; and, a quick read.

Workshop Summary    Workshop Slides

Managing Social Justice Fatigue and Activism Burnout
Caitlyn LoMonte and Sam Becker
This interactive workshop will focus on exploring the concepts of social justice fatigue and activism burnout and the implications on individuals working to create change within systems of oppression, power, and privilege. Social justice fatigue can be understood as a chronic exhaustion, stress, and pressure that can result in a pulling away or disengaging from social justice or activist work. Through guided activities, self reflection, and group sharing, the workshop will offer participants the opportunity for a greater understanding of the impact of social justice fatigue and activism burnout on their lived experiences. Participants will also have the chance to identify practices for management of social justice burnout.

Workshop Summary

Intergenerational Trauma and Reconciliation
Brittany Neal, Lynneta Latham, Karma Tsedon, Belinda Richardson
This session will start with a brief overview of the 1994 Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda then go into an exploration of therapeutic approaches and community organizing strategies we learned through our Amplify Madison project in this country.

Workshop Summary   Workshop Slides

Sick and Tired: Advancing Health Equity in Rural Communities
Shani Collins Woods
Residents of rural communities face numerous barriers to achieving health equity including racism and systematic discrimination. Social workers can act as change agents in rural areas by working with communities and policymakers to address discrimination as well as barriers in the areas of employment, housing, education, health care, public safety and food access. In this workshop, Dr. Shani Collins Woods uses empirically based research, to explain the policy, practice, and research implications of advancing health equity in rural communities.

Confronting & Combating Educational Practices That Negatively Impact the Educational and Emotional Experiences of African-American Girls in K-12 Schools: A Call to Action
Jendayi Mbalia
This workshop focuses on the neglect of African-American girls’ identities in K-12 schools. Through illumination of non-inclusive educational practices, researcher-facilitator Jendayi Mbalia will shed light on the role intersectionality plays in the academic and emotional advancement of African-American girls. This workshop is relevant for all those working in the field of education including but not limited to the following: school social workers, counselors, teachers, and administrative staff.

Workshop Summary    Workshop Slides

CRC Repair Harm, Rebuild Community
Ron Johnson
Present the Dane County Community Restorative Court (CRC), a pre-charge diversion initiative for 17-25 year olds; including purpose, goals &objectives, demographics and program statistics. The CRC, a restorative justice-based program, is an innovative way to expedite misdemeanor and municipal cases and provide an alternative to the traditional system. The CRC model works to hold respondents accountable, while providing human service intervention and support with the work of senior social worker, Stephanie Marino and community volunteers called Peacemakers. The workshop will highlight the impact of social work involvement in real people’s lives, a restorative justice perspective presented by UW Law Professor, Jon Sharrerand finally, a law enforcement analysis offered by Dane County District Attorney Attorney Ismael Ozanne

Workshop Summary  Workshop Slides

Let’s Map It Out Workshop
Darius Carr
The Let’s Map It Out workshop is a crash course in the SAT (structures; attitudes; transactions) model to uncovering macro and micro level issues to complex social problems. Attendees will have the opportunity to create a mapping project around gun violence, explore ways to incorporate the model into their current practice, and conclude with a discussion of community mapping.
Appropriate as an introductory workshop on the topic

Workshop Summary

The People We Serve: Engaging a Diversity of People
Dion Racks and Cynthia Muhar
This workshop offers a valuable opportunity for social workers to examine relational factors in their practice, as part of a process of lifelong learning and continued self-reflection. Participants will explore how to effectively work and engage with diverse populations. The intent of the presentation is to challenge personal perspectives of working with people who are perceived as different, as means to support a meaningful shift in professional practice. Determine how to engage, build, and maintain trust with the people we serve in a culturally responsive manner.

Workshop Summary    Workshop Slides     Handout 1    Handout 2     Handout 3

 

The space between self-disclosure and self-healing: Exploring the personal impact of client assumptions that exclude our invisible, marginalized identities
Kianna Goodwin
Our marginalized identities are often made more complex by how they become invisible in our professional lives. Many clinicians and social workers have invisible identities related to their race, socio-economic background, gender identity, mental health, or sexual orientation that they struggle to feel validated in with their work. How do our client’s inferred assumptions about those identities impacts us psychologically? How does the choice to disclose or not to disclose relate to and impact our relationship to these identities?

Workshop Summary

Juvenile Justice Reform and Your Part in the System
Aaliyah Ford and Marissa Long
This workshop is meant to inform the audience about the history of the Juvenile Criminal System and how it came to be what it is today. While analyzing micro and macro systems across the nation, we will attempt to localize the issues to see how it functions in our own city, Madison, WI. In the process of this program, we will provide ways to get involved in this community to actively combat the cycle in inequality. By the end of this session, we hope that people leave with more knowledge and tools to advocate for criminal reform locally and nationally.

Workshop Summary  Workshop Slides

Viewing our Work Through a Racialized Lens
Antonia Drew Vann
This presentation is designed to explore the history of marginalized providers addressing violence against women. In particular, engagement will center on the voices of Black and Brown women and the intersectionality of race and economics.

Workshop Summary

Healing Racial Violence: The Power of Consciousness & Communication
Shani Saxon and Marya Sosulski
Understanding the origins of racial conflict and trauma from a human services perspective. Addressing privilege and oppression, while promoting equal opportunity efforts that help communities, public agencies, businesses, and schools identify and prevent or eliminate discrimination, bias, and unfair practices. Open up to a cross-cultural communication among peers and colleagues that will offer incident response methods and address the underlying long-term effect on community relations.

Clinical Response to Identifying, Understanding and Addressing Racial Trauma in Black Children and Adolescents
Dawn Shelton Williams and Patricia Parker
Racial trauma (race-based) in the lives of black children and youth is very seldom recognized by researchers, scholars and practitioners. This workshop will highlight the physiological, emotional and psychological impact racism and discrimination has on black children and youth’s overall functioning. The workshop will focus on strategies, assessments tools and treatment interventions that incorporate the racial realities of black youth as essential components and service delivery.

Workshop Summary

Historical Trauma of Indigenous People, and The Healing Path Forward
Kat Swanson
This workshop will discuss the historical trauma suffered by indigenous people, and how it shows up today. We will dispel common myths, and address stereotypes of First Nations people. We will identify microaggressions and current systems of oppression. The workshop will focus on establishing action steps to help reduce stigma, avoid cultural appropriation in restorative practices, with final thoughts about the path forward to healing.

See this short video and resource page for more information.

Workshop Summary

Restorative Justice: An Anti-Racist Movement
Eugenia Highland and Alyssa Ivy
Restorative Justice is most commonly understood as an alternative to punishment, a way to transform conflict and repair harm. What are we restoring to when the fundamental conditions of society are unjust? What challenges and tensions do RJ practitioners face when working to implement this work in systems that uphold institutional and structural racism? We can only do so much within an hour and a half, but in this workshop we will deepen our understanding of restorative philosophy as anti-racist work. This work moves beyond interpersonal conflict to take on historical, institutional and peoples-to-peoples harm. We will also explore to apply restorative justice at the micro, mezzo and macro levels to disrupt to school-to-prison pipeline. Appropriate as an introductory workshop on the topic.

Workshop Summary

United for Public Schools: A Love Story
Ali Muldrow and ananda mirilli
Through personal story-telling, two queer women, one Black and one Brown share their survivorship, their experiences as educators, culminating with a decision to run for public office and serve in the Madison School Board of Education. Both women have been miseducated in Madison and abroad. They both experienced the complexities of a progressive liberal city controlled by a dominant narrative and its inability to reflect on their electoral representation. So why they decided to do it again? By writing a love story to each other and their community, they birthed a loving and supportive collaborative political campaign. The campaign was rooted in an innovative approach of electoral race beyond the molds and constraints of political prescription. This Black and Brown unity symbolized teamwork, comoraderity and solidarity. Their movement shifted from common strategies around individualism, inflating self-image, hoarding of capital and power, use of single narratives around social problems and etc. to being committed to a fluid collected vision of change. Through a multiracial movement they have challenged business as usual by offering inspiration, in that process they realized a fertile ground for inspiration. They re-imagined a political campaign with creativity and love, they inspired voters, students and the community at-large and they are emulating the complexities of their identities in public office.

Workshop Summary